BEST PRACTICE

Add Oomph To Your Office 365 Landing Page

Lisa Redburg By Lisa Redburg, Senior Project Manager & Meticulous Cat Wrangler, Extra Mile Marketing

Adoption of Microsoft Office 365 has been growing steadily since its release in 2011, but there is still a large market that has yet to be tapped. In fact, a study published by Spiceworks found that more than 8 out of 10 organizations still use premises-based Microsoft Office products. That’s an attractive addressable market considering that legacy versions of the Office suite have been losing support.

If you’re in the business of reselling Office 365, there are several core components you should include in your strategy. It all starts with an informative landing page. Whether your target customer already knows all about Office 365 or has never heard of it, a well-designed landing page can show off the powerful functionalities of the SaaS, while simultaneously communicating your organization’s value-add.

Solidify Your Value Proposition

Your value proposition should make it clear right away why the reader should buy Office 365 from your company. By creating a value proposition specific to your Office 365 offering, you can communicate the value added by your company that prospects won’t find anywhere else. Maybe you have the fastest implementation available, can handle difficult migration, or offer added security features. Whatever the value-add, communicate it directly and early on in the customer journey.

Address Pain Points

The cloud revolution is well underway, but many SMB decision makers might not fully understand the advantages of a cloud-based solution like Office 365. Migrating away from on-premises solutions can lighten the load on IT departments while mitigating the risk of in-house system crashes. Don’t take for granted that prospects know why the cloud is best for their organization. Educate them about the benefits of the cloud, but also reveal to them the pains associated with on-premises solutions that they’ve probably learned to live with.

Offer a Comparative List of Plans

Office 365 is designed to be just as effective for small businesses as for large enterprises. By offering an easy-to-read comparison chart of the different plans you offer, you can begin to target prospects more effectively. Make it clear which plan is ideal for different sized businesses and different situations. Then, direct your prospect to further information that is relevant to their specific needs.

Cross-sell and Upsell

You’ve educated prospects about the benefits of Office 365, you’ve made your organization’s value-add clear, and you’ve convinced them that on-premises solutions will cost them more in the long run. Now, toward the end of the customer journey, remind prospects about other services and products your organization offers. They’re about to make a long-lasting decision affecting their company’s productivity and collaboration—invite them to maximize their purchase.

 

Start converting more prospects to Office 365 with an effective, dedicated landing page. Including these core components will ensure you take full advantage of the addressable market. Need help communicating your value-add, or building a professional landing page? Contact EMM today for a free consultation.

If you’d like to learn more, drop us a note!

lisa@emminc.com

 

STATS & FACTS

By October 2020, perpetual-license Microsoft Office products won’t be able to connect with other Office 365 services.

58.4% of sensitive data in the cloud is stored in Microsoft Office documents (SkyHighNetworks.com)

A survey conducted by Spiceworks showed that many organizations still use ancient office editions: Office XP (15 percent), Office 2000 (21 percent) and Office 97 (3 percent).

20% of corporate employees use an Office 365 cloud service (SkyHighNetworks.com)

 

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